Saint Charbel Makhlouf by Ermes Dovico

Saint of the day


Saint John of Avila

Saint John of Avila

Mystic and Doctor of the Church, precursor and advisor of the Council of Trent, model for priests and a “prophetic figure”, as Paul VI called him when he canonized him in 1970. Saint John of Avila (c. 1500-1569) was all of these.


Saint Pachomius

Saint Pachomius

Saint Pachomius (c. 292-348), generally considered the founder of cenobitic monasticism, achieved several records in the history of Christianity. These records are all the more surprising considering that he was born of pagan parents: proof of how Providence works wonders through those who give their full acceptance to the divine will.


Saint Victor

Saint Victor

Saint Ambrose's piety towards the martyrs accounts for much of the popularity of the cult of Saint Victor (†303), one of the most beautiful figures to have been witness to Christ during the Great Persecution, to the point of giving up his life. Ambrose, bishop of Milan since 7 December 374, spoke of him in the Expositio evangelii secundum Lucam and in the hymn Victor, Nabor, Felix pii.


Saint Rosa Venerini

Saint Rosa Venerini

Among the great figures of Christian pedagogy is Saint Rosa Venerini (1656-1728), the founder of the Maestre Pie (Pious Teachers). She focused on giving girls a good education, together with the teaching of the truths of faith and morals.


Saint Dominic Savio

Saint Dominic Savio

The world could become an anticipation of Paradise if only care were taken to teach and have children read the life of St. Dominic Savio (1842-1857), the little giant of holiness who blossomed fully at the school of St. John Bosco.


Saint Angelo of Sicily

Saint Angelo of Sicily

Saint Angelo of Sicily (c. 1185-1220), also known as “of Jerusalem” because of his birthplace, was born in the Holy City from Jews converted to Christianity. After the death of his parents, he and his twin brother John entered the monastery of Mount Carmel, whose spirituality was inspired from the beginning by the example of the Blessed Virgin and the prophet Elijah.


Saints John Houghton, Robert Lawrence, Augustine Webster, Richard Reynolds

Saints John Houghton, Robert Lawrence, Augustine Webster, Richard Reynolds

The saints remembered today were the first to suffer martyrdom for refusing to take the oath to the Act of Supremacy of 1534, which declared King Henry VIII supreme head of the Church of England. These were the Carthusian Protomartyrs John Houghton, Robert Lawrence and Augustine Webster and the Brigidine monk Richard Reynolds, all martyred on 4 May 1535.


Saints Philip and James the Lesser

Saints Philip and James the Lesser

The two apostles Philip and James the Lesser are remembered with a single liturgical feast because their relics, transferred respectively from Hierapolis and Jerusalem, were placed together in the Basilica of the Twelve Holy Apostles in Rome. Their joint worship was established with the 1969 calendar reform.


Saint Athanasius

Saint Athanasius

The five times this man of Providence was forced into exile for his indomitable defence of the true faith, which was threatened by the Arians, shine a light on why Saint Athanasius (c. 295-373) was called “the Great”.


Saint Joseph the Worker

Saint Joseph the Worker

On May 1, 1955, Pius XII instituted the feast of “St. Joseph the Worker” to help workers not to lose sight of the Christian sense of labour, so fully incarnated in the humble carpenter of Nazareth and glorious putative father of Jesus.


Saint Pius V

Saint Pius V

An impressive number of achievements were accomplished in the six years of the pontificate of Saint Pius V (1504-1572), one of the greatest figures of the Catholic Reformation, who defended the true faith against heresies and linked his name to the Battle of Lepanto.


Saint Catherine of Siena

Saint Catherine of Siena

The stigmata, the ecstasies, the conversations with God, the bilocations were just some of the countless graces received by Catherine of Siena (1347-1380), co-patroness of Italy and Europe.