• SAINTS AND GASTRONOMY/ 4

    Catherine of Bologna, her body is a witness to sanctity

    Intact, placed in a glass chapel in the Corpus Domini Monastery in Bologna, the body of Saint Catherine de' Vigri (†1463) continues to secrete a fragrant oil, which is why her clothes are changed periodically. Many believers have experienced graces and healings by praying at her tomb. She was an abbess and lived in an austere way, although she loved the cuisine of her land. The Poor Clares she led were famous for their fresh filled pasta.
    THE RECIPE: VENUS CASKET

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    • THE CASE

    "Paedophile from birth"? Here's how perversion is legitimised

    A scientific article published on the Psychologytoday.com portal is an attempt to present paedophile behaviour as something “natural.” This is certainly not the first attempt to explain the origins of paedophilia following the classic Overton Window method.

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    • FROM MUSSOLINI TO STALIN

    Maniacs and perverts: dictators also between the sheets

    Mussolini was a maniacal womaniser; Togliatti was duplicitous even in his betrayals and abortions; Hitler was bisexual, perverted and sadomasochistic; Berija was a pornographer and Stalin a paedophile for “plump underage girls”. The sex lives of the 20th century dictators are no shining examples of virtue. A detailed study.

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    • THE RECIPE

    Ring of Saint Aloysius Gonzaga

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    • SAINTS AND GASTRONOMY / 3

    Saint Aloysius Gonzaga and Mantuan cuisine

    In order to follow Jesus, Saint Aloysius Gonzaga renounced all his possessions and his hereditary rights over the marquisates of Mantua and Castiglione. His illustrious lineage has also left its mark on the history of food. Mantua’s culinary tradition is very rich, ranging from the famous salami to tiròt and bevr’in vin.

    - THE RECIPE: RING OF SAINT ALOYSIUS GONZAGA

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    • EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP

    A “Made in Italy" canine mascot set for football victory

    As with many sports, teams often adopt a mascot, and this year at the European Championship is no exception. Italy, a major competitor and past champion, has adopted the cutest canine mascot modeled on an extraordinary Italian breed, the maremmano-abruzzese sheep dog...

    • THE RECIPE

    Yemas de Santa Teresa

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    • SAINTS AND GASTRONOMY / 2

    Teresa of Ávila and Castilian cuisine

    Despite the universal character of her work, the life of Saint Teresa began and ended in the same place, the region of Castile and Leon. A place known for its quality wines, the variety of sweets, its roasts, cold meats and cheeses. Simple but delicious dishes, from the Chuletón de Avileño to the Conejo escabechado. The Carmelite reformer herself, although very austere, loved good food and rewarded her sisters with sweets that became known as Yemas de Santa Teresa.

    - THE RECIPE: YEMAS DE SANTA TERESA

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    • THE RECIPE

    Kremówka Papieska

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    • SAINTS AND GASTRONOMY / 1

    Saint John Paul II and Polish cuisine

    Karol Wojtyła always had a special relationship with food, an almost spiritual relationship: sharing, communication, joy. He spent part of his life eating simple, modest and frugal food. He loved traditional Polish cuisine, from pierogi to delicious paczki and the famous kremowka, later called Kremówka Papieska (the Pope's Cream Cake).

    - THE RECIPE: KREMÓWKA PAPIESKA

    Italiano
    • TRADITION VS IDEOLOGY

    A guide to avoiding harmful children’s books

    The habit of telling stories to children is dying out, as people forget the great function of traditional tales. But the enemies of the Logos continue to churn out children’s stories. How can we understand what sort of book we have in our hands? Here are some questions to consider: Who is the enemy? How do you beat the enemy? Is there growth and change? How does the story end? The answers will help you to get your bearings.

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    • CHRISTIANITY AND FORBIDDEN FOODS/3

    Horse meat, a taboo rooted in history

    In Judaism, horse meat is considered “impure”. For Christians, however, the roots of this prohibition go back to the 8th century, when Gregory III, following the victory of Charles Martel in the Battle of Poitiers, banned the consumption of horse meat. His successor, Pope Zacharias, confirmed the ban for reasons related to the pagan sacrifices of the Germans. Traces of this aversion to horse meat remain in many Christian areas.

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